1. London, Spring 2014

    London, Spring 2014

  2. London, Spring 2014

    London, Spring 2014

  3. 20 July 2014

    162 notes

    Reblogged from
    johanna

    EVERYONE GET THIS!!! AMAZING!!!
tokyo-camera-style:

johanna:

Another cover design approved! Textured/embossed paperback cover printed in two special inks, plus a matt laminated half jacket.
The book is due out in 2015 and will bring a smile to the lips - plus an intense yearning to trawl eBay and second-hand camera shops - perfect for analogue camera lovers and geeks! Hundreds of vintage, customised and rare camera makes, models and lenses all captured and meticulously identified. A careful selection of street fashion photographs taken on the fly, with the camera as the star, taken by the man who did it first and the man who does it best - the sartorialist of the camera world John Sypal.

It’s with extreme pleasure that I am finally able to announce that the Tokyo Camera Style photobook is set to be released by renowned publisher Thames & Hudson in 2015.  
It all started back in the fall of 2013 with an email out of the blue from a design director at T&H (the owner of the tumblr this image is reblogged from) telling how much she enjoyed the site and asking if I had ever thought about making a Tokyo Camera Style book.  To be honest, it wasn’t actually something I had given serious consideration, but with the backing of Thames & Hudson and a desire to see just how photobooks are made from the inside it was a project that I was excited to agree to.
The book designer, Andersen M Studio, did a fantastic job on the layout and cover design- it’s really well done and I’m not just saying that because I created the content. The three hundred pages of images have a smart and enjoyable flow.  I think you’ll like it, too.
It’s been an incredible experience so far- it’s been a chance to deal with these pictures in a new way, a chance to see them curated and laid out by someone else, and my favorite part- this has been a chance to make some new connections and friends.  It’s all very exciting and I plan on keeping you up to date over the next few months before it hits the shelves.  The actual release date has yet to be announced but I will certainly let you know once I am able.
Finally, I want to thank all 10,000+ of you who follow Tokyo Camera Style on Tumblr and everyone else who visits the site by whatever other means- it’s thanks to your interest and enjoyment of this site over the past six years that has helped make it all possible.  
Thank you!
- John 

    EVERYONE GET THIS!!! AMAZING!!!

    tokyo-camera-style:

    johanna:

    Another cover design approved!

    Textured/embossed paperback cover printed in two special inks, plus a matt laminated half jacket.

    The book is due out in 2015 and will bring a smile to the lips - plus an intense yearning to trawl eBay and second-hand camera shops - perfect for analogue camera lovers and geeks!

    Hundreds of vintage, customised and rare camera makes, models and lenses all captured and meticulously identified.

    A careful selection of street fashion photographs taken on the fly, with the camera as the star, taken by the man who did it first and the man who does it best - the sartorialist of the camera world John Sypal.

    It’s with extreme pleasure that I am finally able to announce that the Tokyo Camera Style photobook is set to be released by renowned publisher Thames & Hudson in 2015.  

    It all started back in the fall of 2013 with an email out of the blue from a design director at T&H (the owner of the tumblr this image is reblogged from) telling how much she enjoyed the site and asking if I had ever thought about making a Tokyo Camera Style book.  To be honest, it wasn’t actually something I had given serious consideration, but with the backing of Thames & Hudson and a desire to see just how photobooks are made from the inside it was a project that I was excited to agree to.

    The book designer, Andersen M Studio, did a fantastic job on the layout and cover design- it’s really well done and I’m not just saying that because I created the content. The three hundred pages of images have a smart and enjoyable flow.  I think you’ll like it, too.

    It’s been an incredible experience so far- it’s been a chance to deal with these pictures in a new way, a chance to see them curated and laid out by someone else, and my favorite part- this has been a chance to make some new connections and friends.  It’s all very exciting and I plan on keeping you up to date over the next few months before it hits the shelves.  The actual release date has yet to be announced but I will certainly let you know once I am able.

    Finally, I want to thank all 10,000+ of you who follow Tokyo Camera Style on Tumblr and everyone else who visits the site by whatever other means- it’s thanks to your interest and enjoyment of this site over the past six years that has helped make it all possible.  

    Thank you!

    - John 

  4. London, Spring 2014

    London, Spring 2014

  5. London, Spring 2014

    London, Spring 2014

  6. 16 July 2014

    33 notes

    Reblogged from
    storyrd

    storyrd:

The Road is Calling

As a way to keep my connection with shooting film alive,  I have been on a mission to re-acquire all of the film cameras that I’ve used since first picking up one in high school.  Now another one has come home to the Story Road.Before I sold my Nikon outfit and moved to a Leica system, I packed this beauty. This Nikon F3 was a workhorse  for most all of my  photojournalist friends at the great Philadelphia newspapers in the mid to late 1980’s.Though this one does not have the original Highpoint viewfinder that I owned, it was still a gem to shoot.  I coupled it with an MD-4 motor drive which easily helped burn through the then plentiful film at 5 fps.It arrived this week. No motor, no HP viewfinder. But, it came with a lot of memories and a mission to create new ones, on film, manually…one frame at a time.  See you down the Road.

Lancaster, Pennsylvania

    storyrd:

    The Road is Calling

    As a way to keep my connection with shooting film alive,  I have been on a mission to re-acquire all of the film cameras that I’ve used since first picking up one in high school.  Now another one has come home to the Story Road.

    Before I sold my Nikon outfit and moved to a Leica system, I packed this beauty. This Nikon F3 was a workhorse  for most all of my  photojournalist friends at the great Philadelphia newspapers in the mid to late 1980’s.

    Though this one does not have the original Highpoint viewfinder that I owned, it was still a gem to shoot.  I coupled it with an MD-4 motor drive which easily helped burn through the then plentiful film at 5 fps.

    It arrived this week. No motor, no HP viewfinder. But, it came with a lot of memories and a mission to create new ones, on film, manually…one frame at a time.  See you down the Road.

    Lancaster, Pennsylvania

  7. London, Spring 2014

    London, Spring 2014

  8. micdotcom:

    Charts show how history’s most brilliant people scheduled their days

    Based on research from Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work, Podio created beautiful charts that show how some of modern society’s greatest thinkers, writers, artists and philosophers spent their days. It begins with the earliest risers and reveals how much time each of them spent sleeping, working, socializing, relaxing, exercising and at their day jobs or doing administrative stuff like managing their holdings or paying taxes.

    Read more | Follow micdotcom 

  9. London, Spring 2014

    London, Spring 2014

  10. punkroyaltiger:

Underdogs issue 1
http://issuu.com/isagelb/docs/underdogs-issue_1 Here is the first issue of Underdogs, my own photography publication to feature photographers I love the work. There are so many that I think I’m going to publish 100 issues! There are no interviews. I decided to let artists free to write or not about themselves and/or their work. Next issue: october 2014. Enjoy!
Featured photographers:
Danté Beltwww.flickr.com/photos/78979713@N07/ www.dantebelt.tumblr.com/www.cargocollective.com/dantebelt/Su Bowww.flickr.com/photos/92882419@N03/Gaston Cerbinowww.flickr.com/photos/otroangulo/Jonathan  illingworthwww.flickr.com/photos/jonnywuden/Dan Mitchell-Inneswww.flickr.com/photos/12263029@N00/www.blurb.co.uk/b/762970-portraitsNetra Neiwww.flickr.com/photos/netranei/www.netranei.com/Petter Togstad Stigewww.petterfoto.tumblr.com/
Thomas vesterlidwww.flickr.com/photos/50217178@N04/Tystys
Tyrone Williams

    punkroyaltiger:

    Underdogs issue 1

    http://issuu.com/isagelb/docs/underdogs-issue_1
    Here is the first issue of Underdogs, my own photography publication to feature photographers I love the work. There are so many that I think I’m going to publish 100 issues! There are no interviews. I decided to let artists free to write or not about themselves and/or their work. Next issue: october 2014. Enjoy!

    Featured photographers:

    Danté Belt
    www.flickr.com/photos/78979713@N07/
    www.dantebelt.tumblr.com/
    www.cargocollective.com/dantebelt/

    Su Bo
    www.flickr.com/photos/92882419@N03/

    Gaston Cerbino
    www.flickr.com/photos/otroangulo/

    Jonathan  illingworth
    www.flickr.com/photos/jonnywuden/

    Dan Mitchell-Innes
    www.flickr.com/photos/12263029@N00/
    www.blurb.co.uk/b/762970-portraits

    Netra Nei
    www.flickr.com/photos/netranei/
    www.netranei.com/

    Petter Togstad Stige
    www.petterfoto.tumblr.com/

    Thomas vesterlid
    www.flickr.com/photos/50217178@N04/

    Tystys

    Tyrone Williams

  11. 11 July 2014

    12 notes

    Reblogged from
    ronas

    OFFSIDE BRAZIL →

    ronas:

    great!

  12. London, Spring 2014

  13. London, Spring 2014

    London, Spring 2014

  14. offthebeatenpathr:

Photography transforms reality into a tautology.
No wonder I have to look away from the internet sometimes.
EDIT: I should mention that this paragraph is from Chapter 4 entitled The Heroism of Vision, p. 111 of Susan Sontag’s On Photography. At this particular point, Sontag is discussing the idea of using the photograph as a tool for the humanist, “to explain man to man.” She is disputing this.
Her answer to this is: “But photographs do not explain; they acknowledge. Robert Frank was only being honest when he declared that ‘to produce an authentic contemporary document, the visual impact should be such as will nullify explanation.’ If photographs are messages, the message is both transparent and mysterious. ‘A photograph is a secret about a secret,’ as Arbus observed. ‘The more it tells you the less you know.’ Despite the illusion of giving understanding, what seeing through photographs really invites is an acquisitive relation to the world that nourishes aesthetic awareness and promotes emotional detachment.”
I am having an interesting discussion with my friends on Facebook about this post. If you haven’t read the whole book, indeed this quote taken out of context could seem like a derogatory remark about photography. How to mention it without giving that impression, aside from presenting the entire book of essays? Not sure…
To me this quote struck home because there is a certain idea, particularly in the field of documentary photography, that somehow it depicts a concrete reality. However, without text, and even with it, it is an aspect of “reality” that is being presented (any student of historiography will be skeptical about the “science” of history). NOT the whole reality, in other words. This idea that documentary photography is different from other art forms (or maybe it’s not “art” but “science?”) in that it captures reality and in this perhaps is indeed heroic. However, each time you focus a camera, you are capturing an aspect of what is in front of you. Removed from the whole situation, and without words, what indeed does it mean? Is it “reality?” Is it then truly separated from other kinds of art, which are filtered through the eyes of the artist, you know, like drawing (!) - and I mean, completely separated? When you see a security camera video, what are you seeing? Is that complete evidence of what is going on in that situation, or, is it a portion of it? And divorced from the actual moment, what does it become after the fact?
Whether or not you agree with Sontag’s theories about photography, it’s something to ponder.
To emphasize more questioning, I highly recommend Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Blow Up,” which touches on this very subject, if not explores it outright - and yes, that’s an interpretation of this film, at any rate. 

    offthebeatenpathr:

    Photography transforms reality into a tautology.

    No wonder I have to look away from the internet sometimes.

    EDIT: I should mention that this paragraph is from Chapter 4 entitled The Heroism of Vision, p. 111 of Susan Sontag’s On Photography. At this particular point, Sontag is discussing the idea of using the photograph as a tool for the humanist, “to explain man to man.” She is disputing this.

    Her answer to this is: “But photographs do not explain; they acknowledge. Robert Frank was only being honest when he declared that ‘to produce an authentic contemporary document, the visual impact should be such as will nullify explanation.’ If photographs are messages, the message is both transparent and mysterious. ‘A photograph is a secret about a secret,’ as Arbus observed. ‘The more it tells you the less you know.’ Despite the illusion of giving understanding, what seeing through photographs really invites is an acquisitive relation to the world that nourishes aesthetic awareness and promotes emotional detachment.”

    I am having an interesting discussion with my friends on Facebook about this post. If you haven’t read the whole book, indeed this quote taken out of context could seem like a derogatory remark about photography. How to mention it without giving that impression, aside from presenting the entire book of essays? Not sure…

    To me this quote struck home because there is a certain idea, particularly in the field of documentary photography, that somehow it depicts a concrete reality. However, without text, and even with it, it is an aspect of “reality” that is being presented (any student of historiography will be skeptical about the “science” of history). NOT the whole reality, in other words. This idea that documentary photography is different from other art forms (or maybe it’s not “art” but “science?”) in that it captures reality and in this perhaps is indeed heroic. However, each time you focus a camera, you are capturing an aspect of what is in front of you. Removed from the whole situation, and without words, what indeed does it mean? Is it “reality?” Is it then truly separated from other kinds of art, which are filtered through the eyes of the artist, you know, like drawing (!) - and I mean, completely separated? When you see a security camera video, what are you seeing? Is that complete evidence of what is going on in that situation, or, is it a portion of it? And divorced from the actual moment, what does it become after the fact?

    Whether or not you agree with Sontag’s theories about photography, it’s something to ponder.

    To emphasize more questioning, I highly recommend Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Blow Up,” which touches on this very subject, if not explores it outright - and yes, that’s an interpretation of this film, at any rate.